Tenth & Spruce

During COVID, handwritten letters are more important than ever

During COVID, handwritten letters are more important than ever

Have you ever received a compliment from a stranger just walking down the street? Do you remember how that made you feel? Have you ever had a friend reach out on one of those days that you were feeling alone. Or maybe you stumbled across a quote online that just sort of spoke to you? That is what The Letter Project does. Its women supporting women. Using handwritten letters to inspire and uplift others when they need it most. 

 

Now through March, when you purchase a blazer from Tenth & Spruce, we’ll donate $5 to The Letter Project to help them in their mission. 

 

“For me, Tenth & Spruce made sense to partner with because we believe in the same things. We both know the power of confidence and believe that every woman is enough on her own. She does enough, she is enough. We seek to empower and embolden; just the same as Tenth & Spruce. We're thrilled to partner!” - Paige Thompson, Executive Director, The Letter Project.

 

“Sometimes it’s the most simple gesture that means the most. Words of encouragement, advice, a compliment - those are things that can make all the difference. The Letter Project offers support, and that feeling that you are not alone, to women and girls across the country who are going through something. It’s a truly special organization, with a really special mission, and we are proud to support them.” - Alicia Moore, Founder

 

Tell me more about the Letter Project? Okay! 

 

The Letter Project is a faith-based, non-profit seeking to remind women and girls they are enough, no matter what. The Letter Project invites women into a community that builds each other up, and encourages one another through individualized letters. There is no such thing as too big or too small a request when it comes to The Letter Project; their intention is to meet girls and women exactly where they are. From a woman receiving a letter regarding a recent traumatic experience, to a five-year old girl receiving a letter regarding her less than adequate haircut, there is power in the written word, especially during a global pandemic. 

 

Why now?

This year has been filled with hardship for many. Across the globe, we have witnessed unprecedented employment loss, death, and personal hardship and anxiety is at an all-time high. Authentic human connection, in this case via a handwritten letter, is perhaps more important now than ever before. 

 

“There has never been a more powerful time to write a letter. Handwritten letters remind us that people are inherently good,” added Paige. 

 

How does it work? How else can I get involved in The Letter Project? 

 

Individuals are able to request letters for themselves or for loved ones in their lives. Each letter writer is able to write to selected individuals who are experiencing life, or have a need, that they can empathize with. Letters are then collected, beautifully bundled, and gifted to the recipient. 

 

“Our recipients don’t just read these letters once. These women champion them. They are pulled out again and again, serving as a reminder of one’s inherent worthiness and strength,” said Paige.

 

This idea of inherent goodness is a recurring theme for the community within The Letter Project, as strangers unknowingly congregate across the world to share in lifting other women up. 

 

What initiatives or events are you currently working on? 


The Letter Project is encouraging folks to host Write Nights for Galentine's Day. Use Zoom, Hangout, or have a small write night with those you interact with at home or work. They will provide the letter requests and you and your friends can write together. It's such a great way to get together and do good at the same time. More info about hosting a Write Night can be found here. Galentine's Day is February 13.